Lunar Eclipse Paints Sky Red

Written by The Night Sky Guy on April 15, 2014 – 12:40 pm -

The full moon blushed in the skies above the entire Western Hemisphere this morning.

The lunar eclipse has come and gone and it was a hit and miss affair for many as some locations were clouded out in North America.  But many got great views of the moon gliding through Earth’s shadow and stunning photo opportunities presented themselves. Check out this amazingly crisp and vivid portrait of our moon while in the totality phase by Joel Tonyan in Colorado.

Check out this great gallery for more eclipse shots.  Remember the next lunar eclipse will be on October 8, 2014!  Let’s hope for clear skies.

Credit:Joel Tonyan

Credit:Joel Tonyan


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Watch Lunar Eclipse LIVE Webcast

Written by The Night Sky Guy on April 14, 2014 – 6:07 pm -

The Virtual Telescope Project and Astronomers Without Borders are teaming up to present the total lunar Eclipse on April 15 to everyone on the planet through live broadcasts from telescopes located throughout North America.

Catch the action starting at 2:30 am EDT /  06:30 UT right here. If video does not load on this page then go directly here.

2014TotalLunarEclipse

Also check out this alternate broadcast provided by the Coca-Cola Science Center at Columbus State University in Georgia. Feed should start Monday @ 11 pm EDT.

Live streaming video by Ustream


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Where is the Total Lunar Eclipse Visible?

Written by The Night Sky Guy on April 14, 2014 – 6:13 am -

eclipsemap

Here’s a wonderful map of the Earth and link for the upcoming lunar eclipse that will tell you whether it’s visible where you are (weather permitting). If you’re in any of the red zone, all or part of the eclipse will be visible to you April 14-15!

Clouded out or wrong side of the Earth during eclipse time? Then join a special LIVE webcast and watch the eclipse unfold on your laptop or mobile device.  Check back  at 11 pm EDT (Monday) for the video feed right here…  eclipse begins at 2 am EDT (06:00 UT April 15).

For a viewer’s guide please check out my previous posts and links below.


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Video: Lunar Eclipse 101

Written by The Night Sky Guy on April 13, 2014 – 4:23 pm -

Check out my Weather Network interview on the science behind the April 2014 total lunar eclipse.

Read my observer’s guide to this total lunar eclipse at National Geographic.


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Space News Roundup for April 13 2014

Written by The Night Sky Guy on April 13, 2014 – 2:33 pm -

Check out some of the cool space news hitting the wire this past week on my weekly CTV News Channel interview.


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Lunar Eclipse Coming Monday

Written by The Night Sky Guy on April 12, 2014 – 4:32 pm -

Sky-watchers across North and South America continents and most of the Pacific basin are in for a real cosmic treat this coming April 14/15!

The first total lunar eclipse in well over two years will grace our skies and will be the first of four – a tetrad – of eclipses of the moon that will occur over the next 18 months.  Best part of this celestial phenomenon is that everyone can watch it unfold- even from light-polluted cities – without any optical aid. All you need are your eyes – and of course clear skies!

Courtesy of Fred Espenak

Courtesy of Fred Espenak

Here is a quick timetable chart for folks in North America – so you know when to look up.  Remember the entire event – as the moon travels across the Earth’s shadow – will take over 3.5 hours. The best part of the eclipse however is when the moon reaches totality and turns a shade of orange – red.

eclipsetimes-apr2014

For a complete viewer’s guide check out my story at National Geographic.


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World Celebrates the Universe in April

Written by The Night Sky Guy on April 3, 2014 – 6:39 am -

2014GAM_200Get set to party with the stars this month! The world’s largest program dedicated to sharing the wonders of the universe kicks off an exciting series of events for space geeks throughout this month.

This year’s Global Astronomy Month (GAM2014) brings together astronomy enthusiasts and organizations worldwide to share the passion for the night sky with everyone, celebrating the motto of “One People, One Sky.”

Founded and coordinated by the international astronomy advocacy organization Astronomers Without Borders (AWB), this month-long star party is in its fifth year and is better than ever with a jam-packed schedule of out-of-this-world programs.  From virtual tours of the night sky, astopoetry contest, cosmic concert and global star parties there is something for everyone.

Check out the entire program schedule here


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Ontario Fireball Sets Off Meteorite Hunt

Written by The Night Sky Guy on March 21, 2014 – 2:28 pm -

This is a shot of the bright metoer that streaked across southwestern Ontario on March 18, 2014 as captured by special all-sky camera monitors. Credit: University of Western Ontario

This is a shot of the bright meteor that streaked across southwestern Ontario on March 18, 2014 as captured by special all-sky camera monitors. Credit: University of Western Ontario

On Tuesday, March 18 at 10:24 pm EDT a super-bright fireball lit up southwestern Ontario skies.

Here is a photo captured by Univ. Western Ontario all-sky camera of the meteor event. Researchers now estimate it was a meteor the size of a basketball that entered Earth`s atmosphere. The cosmic intruder spend about 5 seconds traveling through North American skies before the air pressure pulverized it. Meteor experts say this is the first time in a half decade that such a bright event happened in Ontario.

The space rock most likely fragmented with pieces probably making it to the ground. Now the hunt is on for meteorites just 5 km NW of St. Thomas, Ontario. According to researchers the odds of finding a fragment of the meteor are small since it’s like looking for a needle in a haystack but the general public has the best shot.

Stay tuned for more details as they are made available.


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Luna Visits Red Planet

Written by The Night Sky Guy on February 18, 2014 – 6:29 pm -

This is the view towards the southwest in the early morning of February 20th. Credit: SkySafari by Simulation Curriculum

This is the view towards the southwest in the early morning of February 20th. Credit: SkySafari by Simulation Curriculum

Early bird sky-watchers get to see the Moon glide past our neighboring planet, Mars.

Before Dawn on Thursday, February 20, the brilliant moon will join the Red Planet and the bright, white star Spica.
Riding alongside Spica, the red planet is easy to spot rising in the northeastern sky around 10 pm local time. However the best views are through a telescope at high magnification just before local dawn, when the planet sits nearly overhead, looking toward the south.

The best is yet to come in April when the views of Mars will get better as the distance between our two planets decrease and its planetary disk therefore increases in size, even now some of its surface features are visible.


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Tonight: Jupiter Joins the Moon

Written by The Night Sky Guy on February 10, 2014 – 3:47 pm -

On February 10th after nightfall Jupiter and the moon pair up in the southeast sky. Credit: Stellarium

On February 10th after nightfall Jupiter and the moon pair up in the southeast sky. Credit: Stellarium

At some point  tonight look up at the moon and check out a sparkling visitor nearby.

On Monday, February 10th throughout the night the largest planet in the solar system pairs up with the silvery moon for a beautiful cosmic sight.

Jupiter sits some 660 million kilometers from Earth while the moon is less than 400,000 km away. Yet the two objects look so close in the sky – an illusion of course.  If you hold a pair of binoculars steady you can glimpse the 4 main moons of the gas giant and with a small backyard telescope you can see the planet’ two dark brown cloud bands where winds blow as fast as 800 km per hour!

Positons of Jupiter's 4 largest moons as seen through a telescope on February 10, 2014. Credit: Stellarium

Positons of Jupiter's 4 largest moons as seen through a telescope on February 10, 2014. Credit: Stellarium


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