Moon and Spica makes Pretty Pair

Written by The Night Sky Guy on June 29, 2009 – 4:18 pm -

click to enlarge

click to enlarge

Over the next two nights watch the gibbous Moon glide by the bright star Spica in the southwest horizon after dusk. The pair promises to be quite eye-catching. While the Moon makes it easy to find this 16th brightest star in the sky the next couple of evenings, there is another way you can hunt down Spica when it’s by its lonesome.  A good stargazing trick is to start off at the Big Dipper - which is upside down, high overhead in the evenings. Draw an imaginary line through the Dipper’s handle, out its end and down to the next brightest star – named Arcturus. Then continue following that imaginary line to the next brightest star, which is Spica.  So you Arc to Arcturus, and Spike to Spica. It’s as easy as that.

click to enlarge

click to enlarge

By tomorrow night the Moon will have moved again towards the southern sky, and will have shifted to the left of Spica. Look carefully and you might notice that the two are much closer together than the night before, making it more interesting sight.

By the end of the week the Moon will slowly continue its daily motion and will pair up with sparkling orange coloured star Antares, the lead star in the constellation Scorpius – another cool cosmic event. More details on that coming later this week, so stay tuned.


Tags: ,
Posted in Constellations, Solar System, Stargazing, The Moon, stars | 474 Comments »

Sorry, comments for this entry are closed at this time.